nprfreshair:

The Graph That Should Accompany Every Article About Young Americans and the Recession
Real earnings for young grads with a college degree have now declined for six straight years. “Real average earnings for young grads have fallen by over 15% since 2000, or by about $10,000 in constant 2011 dollars,” PPI reports.
Read more. [Image: Progressive Policy Institute]

FML, I graduated in ‘07, and my salary was not, nor has it ever been, anywhere close to $58,000.  In fact, both of the “professional” jobs I’ve had in my adult life don’t even reach the very bottom marker on this graph - $48,000.  I am a salaried employee who works a minimum of 50 hours per week at BELOW THIS GRAPH’S STARTING POINT, and I am sickeningly relieved to make as much money as I do.
It’s only when I add in the income from my second job that I might breach this graph on this year’s tax return.  Oh yeah - did I mention I have a second job?  Because even when you think you’ve made it, you haven’t.  If you think you’re safe, you aren’t.  That’s the lesson the Aught grads have learned.

nprfreshair:

The Graph That Should Accompany Every Article About Young Americans and the Recession

Real earnings for young grads with a college degree have now declined for six straight years. “Real average earnings for young grads have fallen by over 15% since 2000, or by about $10,000 in constant 2011 dollars,” PPI reports.

Read more. [Image: Progressive Policy Institute]

FML, I graduated in ‘07, and my salary was not, nor has it ever been, anywhere close to $58,000.  In fact, both of the “professional” jobs I’ve had in my adult life don’t even reach the very bottom marker on this graph - $48,000.  I am a salaried employee who works a minimum of 50 hours per week at BELOW THIS GRAPH’S STARTING POINT, and I am sickeningly relieved to make as much money as I do.

It’s only when I add in the income from my second job that I might breach this graph on this year’s tax return.  Oh yeah - did I mention I have a second job?  Because even when you think you’ve made it, you haven’t.  If you think you’re safe, you aren’t.  That’s the lesson the Aught grads have learned.

(Source: theatlantic)