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bombing:

Crystal Gregory - Invasive Doilies, 2011
Crocheted doilies on razor wire fences in New York City

(via zeplum)

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humansofnewyork:

Hey guys. For the next ten days, I’m going to be dedicating HONY to raising money for Hurricane Sandy. We’re going to try to do this in a HONY-like way. All of the blog’s content will be dedicated to telling the stories of people affected by the storm. Sandy left behind a lot of sad stories, but also some happy ones. We’re going to try to tell them all. The good people at Tumblr have stepped in to cosponsor the fundraiser, and they are going to be promoting these stories through their channels. We will simultaneously be holding an Indiegogo campaign. I’m excited to announce that 100% of proceeds will be going to relief efforts: Indiegogo is waiving fees. Paypal is waiving fees. Tumblr is providing goodies. And I’m covering the cost of the photographs. We found a damn good charity too. The Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation is a family-owned charity in Staten Island, located right in the heart of one of the worst hit areas. They’ve been doing amazing work the last couple weeks, and have been endorsed by many government officials. 
I want to emphasize that this is a fundraiser, and not a print sale. With that being said, I can assure you that it will be the last time prints will be made available for at least a year. Perhaps much longer than that. Let’s have some fun next week… and kick some Sandy ass!The campaign page:http://igg.me/p/270131?a=221102

HEY NEW YORKERS/JERSEY GIRLS/PEOPLE SHOPPING FOR HOLIDAY PRESENTS.  This is pretty fucking awesome.  I am a gigantic fan of HONY, and have been following it for a while.  If you were planning on buying anyone art for the holidays, perhaps you could spend $50 on a good cause and get a beautiful photograph out of it?

humansofnewyork:

Hey guys. For the next ten days, I’m going to be dedicating HONY to raising money for Hurricane Sandy. We’re going to try to do this in a HONY-like way. All of the blog’s content will be dedicated to telling the stories of people affected by the storm. Sandy left behind a lot of sad stories, but also some happy ones. We’re going to try to tell them all. The good people at Tumblr have stepped in to cosponsor the fundraiser, and they are going to be promoting these stories through their channels. We will simultaneously be holding an Indiegogo campaign. I’m excited to announce that 100% of proceeds will be going to relief efforts: Indiegogo is waiving fees. Paypal is waiving fees. Tumblr is providing goodies. And I’m covering the cost of the photographs. We found a damn good charity too. The Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation is a family-owned charity in Staten Island, located right in the heart of one of the worst hit areas. They’ve been doing amazing work the last couple weeks, and have been endorsed by many government officials. 


I want to emphasize that this is a fundraiser, and not a print sale. With that being said, I can assure you that it will be the last time prints will be made available for at least a year. Perhaps much longer than that. Let’s have some fun next week… and kick some Sandy ass!

The campaign page:
http://igg.me/p/270131?a=221102

HEY NEW YORKERS/JERSEY GIRLS/PEOPLE SHOPPING FOR HOLIDAY PRESENTS.  This is pretty fucking awesome.  I am a gigantic fan of HONY, and have been following it for a while.  If you were planning on buying anyone art for the holidays, perhaps you could spend $50 on a good cause and get a beautiful photograph out of it?

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beatonna:

I was in New York for the Hurricane Sandy, with Scott.  I drew sketches of it as we went through.  If you click on the picture you’ll see them all in a long image.

This made me really, really, really fucking emotional. I recently found out that Sandy made landfall two miles from the house I grew up in, outside of Ocean City NJ.  But this comic is beautiful, and you should all read it.

beatonna:

I was in New York for the Hurricane Sandy, with Scott.  I drew sketches of it as we went through.  If you click on the picture you’ll see them all in a long image.

This made me really, really, really fucking emotional. I recently found out that Sandy made landfall two miles from the house I grew up in, outside of Ocean City NJ.  But this comic is beautiful, and you should all read it.

Photoset

mattlehrer:

Apocalyptic photos from the MTA.

The zombie enthusiast in me wants to see these pictures taken without any working electricity.  The Hurricane Sandy sympathizer in me is pretty awed.

(via the-megs)

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humansofnewyork:

This boy was part of a group of four zombies. When I asked for a group portrait, the other three zombies seemed reluctant. The boy, however, immediately hit the floor. “Plans have changed,” I said. “Everybody else out of the shot.” 

humansofnewyork:

This boy was part of a group of four zombies. When I asked for a group portrait, the other three zombies seemed reluctant. The boy, however, immediately hit the floor. “Plans have changed,” I said. “Everybody else out of the shot.” 

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nevver:

I had that dream again

The caption makes this science fiction.

nevver:

I had that dream again

The caption makes this science fiction.

(via mawhcus)

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bareknucklesass:

“Trojan is planning a publicity stunt in NYC today wherein they are handing out 10,000 top of the range dildos from two hot dog carts.
The company plans to give out over half a million dollars in dildos – $540,000 to be precise – in the month of August to strengthen their campaign to bring sex toys into the mainstream. The use of the hot dog carts is an attempt to show that, y’know, things that you stick in your vagina (or up your butt) are totally mainstream. Just wait until you get home to use them.”

AW YIS, TROJAN.  Bonus points for lime green testicles and the inclusion of non penetrative toys.

bareknucklesass:

“Trojan is planning a publicity stunt in NYC today wherein they are handing out 10,000 top of the range dildos from two hot dog carts.

The company plans to give out over half a million dollars in dildos – $540,000 to be precise – in the month of August to strengthen their campaign to bring sex toys into the mainstream. The use of the hot dog carts is an attempt to show that, y’know, things that you stick in your vagina (or up your butt) are totally mainstream. Just wait until you get home to use them.”

AW YIS, TROJAN.  Bonus points for lime green testicles and the inclusion of non penetrative toys.

(Source: checkyourthreading)

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I’m going to New York in 1 month.

victron-superior:

Besides going to the Marina concert, where should I go? Where should I shop? Where should I eat?

OH MAN, so I don’t pretend to be anything like a native New Yorker, and I’m sure you’ll get a ton of great (and more important) advice from everyone else, BUT.  My go-to answer to this question is: if you eat at one place, eat at Burger Joint.

I am sliiiightly emotionally attached to this place, because I stumbled upon it when I was 16, and chaperoning (LOL WHAT) a group of younger high school students on a class trip to NYC.  We were staying in the Salisbury, which is across the street (ish) from Le Parker Meridien, and in our teenage wisdom decided to wander around in and out of other storefronts.  Eventually we got to LPM, and were transfixed, because their entrance hallway is a giant mise en abîme,which is a little jarring if you aren’t expecting it.

So we keep wandering down this hallway, realize we’re in this disgustingly swank hotel lobby, and then BAM, there’s this like…giant theatre curtain and, tucked behind it, a cheesy neon hamburger.  That’s it: that’s the only signage you get for Burger Joint.  They make three things: Burgers, Fries, Milkshakes.  (Okay, I see now that the menu has expanded sliiiightly, but still.)  It is, hands down, the best burger you will have in NYC, especially if you’ve walked your ass off to find it.

Also, a ton of celebrities have signed the bare-brick walls, if I recall, and they let you, like, tape your art to the walls and things, and just, okay, just GO, if you enjoy food, and also strange things.  

(via mawhcus)

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magpieandwhale:


the-milk-eyed-mender:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:
Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.
The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”
The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.


I love this! I. Love. This.

Oh my god.  *clutches pearls*  I read about this a few years ago, and then forgot about it, and THERE IT IS, STILL BEING AWESOME, LIKE AN OLD FRIEND OR A GOOD BOOK THAT FELL BEHIND THE BED.

magpieandwhale:

the-milk-eyed-mender:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:

Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.

The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”

The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.

I love this! I. Love. This.

Oh my god.  *clutches pearls*  I read about this a few years ago, and then forgot about it, and THERE IT IS, STILL BEING AWESOME, LIKE AN OLD FRIEND OR A GOOD BOOK THAT FELL BEHIND THE BED.

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Pedestrian Timeline - click for more!