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fireofspring:

implode-on-impact:

hyperboreanhapocanthosaurus:

So you know what I don’t get? Why people repeat words. (x)

Grammar time: it’s called “contrastive reduplication,” and it’s a form of intensification that is relatively common. Finnish does a very similar thing, and others use near-reduplication (rhyme-based) to intensify, like Hungarian (pici ‘tiny’, ici-pici ‘very tiny’).

Even the typologically-distant group of Bantu languages utilize reduplication in a strikingly similar fashion with nouns: Kinande oku-gulu ‘leg’, oku-gulu-gulu ‘a REAL leg’ (Downing 2001, includes more with verbal reduplication as well).

I suppose the difficult aspect of English reduplication is not through this particular type, but the fact that it utilizes many other types of reduplication: baby talk (choo-choo, no-no), rhyming (teeny-weeny, super-duper), and the ever-famous “shm” reduplication: fancy-schmancy (a way of denying the claim that something is fancy).

screams my professor was trying to find an example of reduplication so the next class he came back and said “I FOUND REDUPLICATION IN ENGLISH” and then he said “Milk milk” and everyone was just “what?” and he said “you know when you go to a coffee shop and they ask if you want soy milk and you say ‘no i want milk milk’” and everyone just had this collective sigh of understanding.

Mandarin Chinese does the same with verbs but to the opposite effect— “等等” means wait a little, as opposed to “等” which means wait. It’s often used to be more polite because it softens an imperative verb. “吃吃!” Eat a little! “看看!” Take a look, instead of 看 which would be watch, or see.

chinese also use repetition with nouns - particularly formal nouns. so “猫” which is “cat”, would become “”, which is “little cat” or “kitty”. repeating the last character of a chinese name is a common way to produce nicknames, eg. my chinese name is “dai li wen” (戴立文) and my parents and elders call me “wen wen” (), which is like “little wen”. 

(Source: gifmethat)

Quote
"Mama, I said
He wants to kiss me
And he won’t take no for an answer
She turned to me, eyes blazing
God help me, she said
Who taught these boys you are something to be had?
Don’t they know that your name means strength,
That your father gave it to you knowing what a force you would be?
You’re a wildfire, don’t they know?
You’re the entire ocean, not a puddle
They’ll come up choking for air
Next time you turn your head away from his lips and he turns it back,
Tell him your mother taught you that your body is a temple
Let him kneel before you
Let him pray in a whispered fervor
Let him swear his allegiance
Let him prove his devotion
Honey, you’re a goddamn wildfire
You choose who you burn"

— Fortesa Latifi - Mama (via madgirlf)

(via checkyourthreading)

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futurejournalismproject:

RIP Chaucer
Geoffrey Chaucer, father of English literature, died this day in 1400.
Check the Oxford English Dictionary Twitter feed for some interesting etymology.
For example, the lexicon reports, that “#Chaucer’s texts provide the first recorded example for over 2000 words in the OED.”
This includes such stalwarts as “Twitter” (shown above), “Altercation” (from Merchant’s Tale), “Amble” (for Canterbury Tales) and “Annoying” (in a translation of Boethius).

futurejournalismproject:

RIP Chaucer

Geoffrey Chaucer, father of English literature, died this day in 1400.

Check the Oxford English Dictionary Twitter feed for some interesting etymology.

For example, the lexicon reports, that “#Chaucer’s texts provide the first recorded example for over 2000 words in the OED.”

This includes such stalwarts as “Twitter” (shown above), “Altercation” (from Merchant’s Tale), “Amble” (for Canterbury Tales) and “Annoying” (in a translation of Boethius).

Photoset
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Oh, I quite like this.

Oh, I quite like this.

(Source: teachingliteracy, via acciomjollnir)

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crookedindifference:

Origin of Words
Text

Universal Laws of Words

"Christopher Shea writes in the WSJ that physicists studying Google’s massive collection of scanned books claim to have identified universal laws governing the birth, life course and death of words, marking an advance in a new field dubbed ‘Culturomics’: the application of data-crunching to subjects typically considered part of the humanities. Published in Science, their paper gives the best-yet estimate of the true number of words in English — a million, far more than any dictionary has recorded (the 2002 Webster’s Third New International Dictionary has 348,000), with more than half of the language considered ‘dark matter’ that has evaded standard dictionaries (PDF).

The paper tracked word usage through time (each year, for instance, 1% of the world’s English-speaking population switches from ‘sneaked’ to ‘snuck’) and found that English continues to grow at a rate of 8,500 new words a year. However the growth rate is slowing, partly because the language is already so rich, the ‘marginal utility’ of new words is declining.

Another discovery is that the death rates for words is rising, largely as a matter of homogenization as regional words disappear and spell-checking programs and vigilant copy editors choke off the chaotic variety of words much more quickly, in effect speeding up the natural selection of words. The authors also identified a universal ‘tipping point’ in the life cycle of new words: Roughly 30 to 50 years after their birth, words either enter the long-term lexicon or tumble off a cliff into disuse and go ‘23 skidoo’ as children either accept or reject their parents’ coinages.”

(Source: science.slashdot.org)

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arabiccalligraphy:

هنا كتبت قصيدة محمود درويش “خذي فرسي واذبحيها” على شكل حصان. كتبت القصيدة بالخط الديواني.
.تبدأ القصيدة من رأس الحصان وتنتهي عند ذيله، وقد كتب اسم القصيدة واسم الشاعر في يمين الرسمة
.لقراءة القصيدة اضغط هنا
roxygen:

This piece of Arabic Calligraphy depicts a horse using the text of Mahmoud Darwish’s poem Take My Horse and Slaughter It. The poem is written exactly once, beginning in the head of the horse and finishing in the tail in the Arabic Calligraphy Diwani Jali. The title of the poem, along with the author’s name, is written in the bottom right of the piece.
Take My Horse and Slaughter It
By Mahmoud Darwish
You, and not my craze with conquest, are my wedding.I left to myself and its match in your devil selfthe freedom to comply with your demands,take my horseand slaughter it,and I will walk like a warrior after defeatwithout dream or sense …Salaam upon what you desire of fatiguefor the captive prince, and of gold for the maidensto celebrate the summer. And salaam upon youabounding with suitors of every jinn and man,for what you’ve done to yourself foryourself: your hairpin breaksmy shield and my sword,and your shirt button bears in its glarethe secret word of birds of every sort,take my breath the way a guitar respondsto what you demand of the wind. All of my Andalusis within your hands, so don’t leave a single stringfor self-defense in the land of my Andalus.I will realize, in another time,I will realize that I have won with my despairand that I have found my life, over thereoutside itself, near my pasttake my horseand slaughter it, and I will carry myself dead and alive,by myself…

arabiccalligraphy:

هنا كتبت قصيدة محمود درويش “خذي فرسي واذبحيها” على شكل حصان. كتبت القصيدة بالخط الديواني.

.تبدأ القصيدة من رأس الحصان وتنتهي عند ذيله، وقد كتب اسم القصيدة واسم الشاعر في يمين الرسمة

.لقراءة القصيدة اضغط هنا

roxygen:

This piece of Arabic Calligraphy depicts a horse using the text of Mahmoud Darwish’s poem Take My Horse and Slaughter It. The poem is written exactly once, beginning in the head of the horse and finishing in the tail in the Arabic Calligraphy Diwani Jali. The title of the poem, along with the author’s name, is written in the bottom right of the piece.

Take My Horse and Slaughter It

By Mahmoud Darwish

You, and not my craze with conquest, are my wedding.
I left to myself and its match in your devil self
the freedom to comply with your demands,
take my horse
and slaughter it,
and I will walk like a warrior after defeat
without dream or sense …
Salaam upon what you desire of fatigue
for the captive prince, and of gold for the maidens
to celebrate the summer. And salaam upon you
abounding with suitors of every jinn and man,
for what you’ve done to yourself for
yourself: your hairpin breaks
my shield and my sword,
and your shirt button bears in its glare
the secret word of birds of every sort,
take my breath the way a guitar responds
to what you demand of the wind. All of my Andalus
is within your hands, so don’t leave a single string
for self-defense in the land of my Andalus.
I will realize, in another time,
I will realize that I have won with my despair
and that I have found my life, over there
outside itself, near my past
take my horse
and slaughter it, and I will carry myself dead and alive,
by myself…

(via mindless-meandering)

Link

thereisafish:

You want a physicist to speak at your funeral. You want the physicist to talk to your grieving family about the conservation of energy, so they will understand that your energy has not died. You want the physicist to remind your sobbing mother about the first law of thermodynamics; that no energy gets created in the universe, and none is destroyed. You want your mother to know that all your energy, every vibration, every Btu of heat, every wave of every particle that was her beloved child remains with her in this world. You want the physicist to tell your weeping father that amid energies of the cosmos, you gave as good as you got.

And at one point you’d hope that the physicist would step down from the pulpit and walk to your brokenhearted spouse there in the pew and tell him that all the photons that ever bounced off your face, all the particles whose paths were interrupted by your smile, by the touch of your hair, hundreds of trillions of particles, have raced off like children, their ways forever changed by you. And as your widow rocks in the arms of a loving family, may the physicist let her know that all the photons that bounced from you were gathered in the particle detectors that are her eyes, that those photons created within her constellations of electromagnetically charged neurons whose energy will go on forever.

And the physicist will remind the congregation of how much of all our energy is given off as heat. There may be a few fanning themselves with their programs as he says it. And he will tell them that the warmth that flowed through you in life is still here, still part of all that we are, even as we who mourn continue the heat of our own lives.

And you’ll want the physicist to explain to those who loved you that they need not have faith; indeed, they should not have faith. Let them know that they can measure, that scientists have measured precisely the conservation of energy and found it accurate, verifiable and consistent across space and time. You can hope your family will examine the evidence and satisfy themselves that the science is sound and that they’ll be comforted to know your energy’s still around. According to the law of the conservation of energy, not a bit of you is gone; you’re just less orderly. Amen.

  • Aaron Freeman

I don’t know if this was written as a science vs. faith argument, but I think it transcends that. Beautiful words for everyone.

(Source: NPR, via the-megs)

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(Source: birdirbir, via rachaelora)